Tuesday, March 5, 2013

A Little Chat About Copyright

Recently I came across this pattern being sold by a brick-and-mortar quilt shop. It's my Cross-Terrain quilt pattern, a free pattern that was published on the Moda Bake Shop blog in October 2011.

I did not authorize the shop to sell this pattern, and the Moda Bake Shop didn't authorize it either. In spite of this, the shop was selling a pattern that uses my photography of my quilt, my step-by-step instructional photos, and my text. The name and website of the quilt shop appears on the front and back of the pattern. My name is only mentioned in very small type on the last inside page. My blog, my blog address, and the Moda Bake Shop blog are not mentioned anywhere. The shop was selling this pattern for $4. I didn't see a dime of this money, nor did Moda.

I'm sure you all know this already, but this kind of thing? IS NOT OKAY. Reproducing and selling someone else's pattern is illegal, even if that pattern is available online for free. In this case, I think the shop was well aware that what they were doing was wrong, so I'm not going to waste my breath admonishing them for their illegal and unethical behavior.

But I will try to enlist all of you in the fight to stop this sort of thing.

It was a remarkable coincidence that I even discovered this problem. And if I happened to stumble upon my own pattern being sold illegally, it occurred to me that this kind of thing is probably happening everywhere. My printed patterns are in, ummm, limited distribution at this point. : ) So it's very possible that there are more illegal copies of my patterns out there than there are legal ones—making more money for the unscrupulous folks selling them than I could ever hope to make myself. And if this is happening to me, I guarantee it's happening to other designers as well. It's hard enough for us designers to make a living at this without someone blatantly stealing from us. But we can't be everywhere. So we need your help.

How can you help? Please just keep an eye out for obvious fakes like this pattern. If you come across a pattern that you recognize as being designed by myself or another blogger, please check it out and contact the designer if you think there's anything fishy. Or at the very least, don't buy it!

Here are some ways to recognize an unauthorized pattern:

1. The designer's name, company, and/or website are nowhere to be found, or are not obvious. As I said, my blog/company name was not found on this pattern.

2. The cover design doesn't match the cover of the designer's other patterns—or there's no design at all. Most designers have some sort of company logo or branding. If you don't see that logo, chances are the money isn't headed their way. An example of my current "official" pattern cover design is above. (And by the way, I would never, ever, EVER use the Comic Sans font, under any circumstances! Are you kidding me? That just added insult to injury!)

3. The printing is low-quality. This one's trickier, because some designers do copy their own patterns or print them on a home printer and sell them. And there's nothing wrong with that, as long as it's the designer herself doing it. But personally, as a former graphic designer, I'm a sucker for good printing. : ) So my hard-copy patterns will always be printed in full color, on high-quality glossy paper. They will never be obvious photocopies or home print jobs.

4. Ask yourself if this is a store/location where the designer is likely to sell patterns. At the moment there is exactly one store in the entire United States that sells my hard-copy patterns, and it's just ten minutes from my house. : ) So if you're not buying it from Material Matters in Theinsville, Wisconsin, it's not legit! (Although if you own a shop and are interested in carrying my patterns, I would love to hear from you!)

In the case of my Cross-Terrain pattern, the real victims here were the shop's own customers, since they were paying $4 for what was essentially just a printout of a free internet tutorial. So please help us combat this problem. If you recognize my or any other designer's quilts on a pattern that doesn't look "official," please contact the designer immediately and let them know when and where you saw it. I, for one, promise a free pattern of your choice to anyone who informs me of a legitimate case of theft like this one. Thank you all!

Edited to add: The Moda Bake Shop does encourage shops to make its patterns available free of charge to customers, in shops and as part of classes. I'm completely fine with that, as long as the pattern remains free and my name and blog address are prominently included.

As I said in reply to a comment below, the bottom line is, if a shop is making money from a pattern, the designer and/or publisher should be as well. Any other scenario is not okay. Thanks.

93 comments:

  1. I can't believe the nerve of some people! I'm glad you published this post!

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  2. How does it work if they copy your free pattern and insert it into a kit? Technically is it part of the price or are they selling fabric with your free pattern as inspiration for the fabric? I've seen things like that before rather than selling an obviously printed at the store pattern (not yours, just patterns attached to fabric kits).

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    1. Sorry, my comment up there messed up. :) I'm not Lee...but my thoughts on this is it would be ok only if the shop had permission from either the pattern owner and/or Moda Bake Shop (in this case). But it's not ok to just do it without asking anyone.

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    2. Thanks for the question, Kathy! I agree with Faith - I would be okay with this as long as the shop just asks my permission (or the Bake Shop's, in this case), AND as long as they are only charging for the FABRIC — i.e., there shouldn't be any extra charge in there for the pattern. So if the shop has permission and the price is their normal per-yard price for fabric, then personally I would be good with it.

      I should also say that the Moda Bake Shop encourages shops to make copies of the free Bake Shop patterns and distribute them for classes, etc., and I have no issue with that. The problem here is that 1) this shop was charging money for the pattern and not giving me or the Bake Shop any of it; and 2) my name was not prominently featured on the pattern.

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    3. I recently asked Moda for permission to use a template to make something for my church bazaar and they responded immediately that it was ok. It was really easy to request and they forwarded my request to the designer who also responded quickly. super easy and now I feel comfortable if I decide to make something as a donation.

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    4. Yes Moda is very easy to contact! If I see a pattern in a store I like, I ALWAYS go to the web first and check the publishers site first to buy direct, even if it's a few bucks more! I think it's just the right thing to do. I have even purchased 2 copies of PDFs so I could print one out for a friend as a gift. I like to encourage the sharing of free information and patterns and such by supporting properly...I do think there are done things that just should not be copywrighted (McTavishing FMQ for instance---anyone should be able to use it), but this was a blatant violation! I'm sure the penalty is small, but there should still be one. I would like to have seen the look on your face when you walked in, grabbed all those patterns and walked out!

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  3. I hope you told them to take it off-sale!

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  4. just sad. Glad you posted this and hope people take notice.

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  5. Thank you for reminding us. This is so bad, and I hope we all think twice when we meet this next time. Sometimes I give lessons for my friends, but I always let them buy the original pattern from the designer.

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  6. That is unbelievable!! Thank goodness you spotted it!

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  7. It never fails to amaze me how obnoxious some people can be! Thanks for putting the word out.

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  8. You tell em Lee!! Totally ridiculous! And I bet it happens all over the place.

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  9. It takes all kinds Lee!! Glad you found this one anyway.

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  10. Unscrupulous, indeed. I just don't get why anyone would think it was okay.

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  11. Wow, that is totally shocking to me and very sad. =( I can't even imagine how you felt happening upon that or how you dealt with it. =( It's really such a beautiful pattern. Thank you for giving us tips as to how to combat this...not that I frequent many shops, but I will try to be conscious of it in the future.

    I truly appreciate finding wonderful tutorials online...because I don't have a lot of money to spend on patterns...so I hope this doesn't ruin that blessing for those of us who appreciate it so much.

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  12. Wow! I know there are shady people out there but it still surprises me to read something like this. I hope you confronted them!

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  13. Oh my goodness! I hope you gave that shop owner an earful.

    I don't know what would hurt more - the pattern stealing or the comic sans, ha ha.

    Great tips on spotting this. So sad to know that people actually do this!

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  14. I can't believe they did that!!! Did they say who it had come from or had they done it themselves? The words "Do you have a good lawyer?" sound like a good way to broach it with them!

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  15. I really can't believe that a shop would do that! So glad that you found it and also glad you wrote this post. There is no excuse for this type of thing at all.

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  16. I hope that this stops a few people from taking what isn't theirs. I hope that shop learned a lesson.

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  17. Wowza! That's really crazy! And somehow the fact that they're illegally selling a FREE pattern makes it worse to me! I mean, it's one thing to rip off a designer you don't know (a very very wrong and illegal thing), but to swindle your customers like that? SHAME. I hope at the very least someone sent them a cease and desist.


    P.S. Rachel's comment above about the comic sans...hilar.

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  18. That is so disheartening. There is a local shop here which sells free on-line printouts from the manufacturers' sites. It looked like it was a legitimate copy direct from the manufacturer - but what irritated me is that anyone could go and download it for free from the manufacturer and this shop owner sells these for $4 in her store. When I pointed it out to her, she just shrugged and said not everyone has a computer. Whaaaat? I find it offensive. I will keep my eyes open for illegal patterns now - you would think that a business person would be sensitive to copyright, but I have come to find that some people will do anything to make a buck.

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    1. I have a quilt store that does the same thing. She says it is to cover the cost of paper, ink and time.

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  19. Lee, that is horrible! I can't begin to imagine how you must have felt. Hopefully you were able to confront them about it. I want to thank you for the info on how to spot a stolen pattern. I know it should seem obvious, but it never occurred to me that, DUH, if the designer info can't be found it is likely not a good thing. I know someone else asked, but I would also like to know the policy on "sold with a kit" or "sold for use in a class with materials purchased from said shop". There is actually a shop near me that VERY routinely does classes where the pattern is only available with the class, and the last time I was there I picked up the pattern to try to determine the designer and there was no info. The class time was absolutely not doable for me, so I thought I would just find the designer and order the pattern. With that said, I honestly assumed it must be an exclusive to the shop (maybe designed by the gal teaching the class?) Obviously there is a good chance that is not the case. SO sad.

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  20. wow that's terrible! some nerve...totally different if they had printed it and given away for free just to sell fabrics that matches.... wow. what do you do in this situation?

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  21. I hope you said something to the shop owner. She shouldn't be selling it and should take it off the shelf!
    I've heard of this happening a lot lately. There was some website carrying sewing patterns that were free tutorials. It's been shut down but geez ~ what's the matter with these people?

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  22. That's ridiculous! Years ago someone took a class at our quilt shop, and copied all the papers, and started teaching the exact class at her church. Not cool. Too many people want to profit from other people's work. Hope you (and Moda) are able to get some damages and or get this stopped!

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  23. Wow, this has to be one of those rock in the pit of one's stomach moment and I am very glad you came across the happening. To be honest it kind of sounds like a plot of a tv show, afterall a quilt shop should know better! I mean even with all the debate about what people should be able to do with the product made from patterns, there has never been a debate if the pattern or Tutorial itself should be covered under copyright law.

    On a side note, I was curious if you have made sure to enter in a legal copyright for each of your own patterns? It costs about $10 per pattern and I have been told it adds an extra layer of protection. But then, I am not a lawyer so don't quote me!

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  25. A few weeks ago, a few bloggers ran into the same problem. It took some doing, but they manage to have their pattern taken down and I beleive the store as-well. I seldom purchased on-line, unless it comes recommended from a well known source. I also heard that one of my fellow bloggers was hit with a scam when she purchased from an online store and her information was sold. Later, she received her statment and saw chardges that she is now having to fight off and get her money back. I am a supporter to those who are hard honest working folks like yourself. But it is getting much harder to even trust the big companies with all your information. I hope everything goes in your favor and Moda. Judith, Texas

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    1. Hi Judith - that's so unfortunate! I hadn't heard about that case. Fortunately, I think it's actually easier to make sure you're buying a legitimate pattern when you're buying it online. Just Google the designer's name and you should be able to find the designer's website or blog, with links for places to buy their patterns online. In my case, my legitimate online outlets are my own shop, Craftsy, Threadbias, Pink Chalk Fabrics, and Fat Quater Shop.

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    2. Tea Rose Home has just gone through this in the last two weeks. If you pop over to her website you can see what went on. A Lawyer commented on some of it too. I can't believe it is happening so much.

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    3. I'm not sure if this is who Judith is talking about, but a site called Los Angeles Needleworks was selling a lot of free patterns she/they'd taken from various sites, including fandominstitches.com, artisania.com, freshcutquilts.com and others. It was only by chance that someone recognized a free pattern that was being sold there (~$5, and these were just downloads, so they couldn't even make the excuse that it was coving printing costs). It's sad, anyway, what people will do for a couple bucks.

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  26. Holy Wow is that ridiculous!!! How lovely that they like your pattern but how awful that they want to profit from it. I really just do not understand the cut throat world out there. This is what makes me want to put a freaking watermark on every single picture I ever upload. But I'm not quite savvy enough to do that easily.

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  27. That is really really sad. How can anyone think that is okay?? I'm sorry for you, and for those customers - both for being taken advantage of, really. I'll keep an eye out whenever I'm in LQS's from now on.

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  28. I'm so sorry this happened to you Lee. I hope the shop that did it goes out of business within the month. I loved your comment about the Comic Sans font. It cracked me up... my assistant at work is a lover of all crappy fonts.

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  29. I was thinking a bit about this last summer. The shop I was working at sold bake shop patterns indirectly by cutting quilt kits and bundling all together with a print out. I couldn't decide it that was good or bad. I think most likely good, if the designer's info and a web site were shown clearly on the printout - and the fact that it was a free online pattern. What do you think about that one?

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    1. A couple of people have asked about this, and I agree with you that it's fine as long as the designer's name and blog are prominently featured (since that's the whole reason we do these free patterns - for the exposure!). I also think it's important that there's no up-charge for a pattern that's available for free—the shop should be charging its normal per-yard fabric price for the kit. If any part of the price is for the pattern, then the designer should be getting a cut of that!

      The bottom line is, if a shop is making money from a pattern, the designer and/or publisher better be making money from it too. : )

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  30. This is unfortunate, and what makes it worse is you know it's not an isolated occurrence. I'm curious as to how you approached the shop owner, and what will prevent them from continuing this practice, because as a consumer I don't want to purchase items available for free online. Thanks for the tips on how to spot a fake.

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    1. Thanks for your comment, Susan! How do I prevent them from continuing this practice? I can't really—that's the problem. I asked them to remove my pattern from sale, and they SAID they did, but I don't trust them, and I certainly don't trust them not to do this with someone else's pattern. The only thing I can do beyond that is tell the consumers about the problem so they can be on the lookout. Which is exactly why I posted about this!

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    2. Well one surefire way to keep them in line is to publicly post their name here. A little public shaming goes a long way and I bet they would hear about it from some angry quilters. But what counts most is that you handle it in the way that is most comfortable for you, so if that is by speaking to them privately, that's fine too.

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  31. wow! That's just plain deceitful! They know its free and yet they are charging $4!!! I won't buy from them, ever! You should publish their name!

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  32. So, so insane. I can hardly believe that!! Some people have no ethics at all.

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  33. Absolutely brutal. I mean really - Comic Sans? But seriously - so unethical not to mention illegal. I think you should name and shame, baby. Name and shame.

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  34. Unbelievable! Plus, this just happened to Artisania a few weeks back--and a bunch of others commenting on her blog posts said it happened to them, too!

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  35. Downright wrong. There's no justifying what the shop were doing and I can't imagine how they thought that it would be okay to sell a free pattern, never mind doing it without contacting the designer/owner and without full credit where it was due and needed. Disgraceful!

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  36. How horrible! This is why I always try to order my patterns directly from the designer. I think they can be cheaper that way anyway! I'll keep my eyes peeled for sure.

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  37. Gosh Lee that is awful. You would think people would be more ethical. So sorry and glad you found out. Thanks for bringing this to our attention.

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  38. Check out this site -- jellyrolls2go (dot) com ..... She sells a lot of the FREE Moda bake shop patterns for 5.95!!
    Grrrrr

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    1. Kathy, thanks for noticing this! I will say that it's POSSIBLE Moda is printing these patterns and selling the printed version to shops wholesale. I don't know if Moda does that or not. All I know is they definitely didn't do that with my Bake Shop tutorial (or with any Bake Shop tutorials that I'm aware of).

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  39. We've discussed this a lot recently with the owner of our local quilt shop who designs and sells her own patterns and wouldn't dream of doing what you've described, but knows some of her patterns have been bought, copied and sold. I think the other side of the issue, and the one that annoys me a lot is when people buy the pattern, then photocopy it for their friends - someone offered this to me last weekend and I let her know exactly what I thought (my middle name is "subtle") - but if I were a designer I would be gutted with what you saw and with people copying the pattern just to save themselves a few pounds - the way I see it, the designer needs that money to go towards producing her next pattern, and if we deny them that money, we may notget any more paterns from the fantastic designers out there. Thanks for posting!

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  40. It never ceases to amaze me what some people have the brass neck to do! They do it knowing that it's illegal, and they happily rake in the money from other people's work assuming they'll never get caught, and let's face it, even if they've taken yours off the shelf (in case you come back and catch them again) there's hundreds of other free patterns to work their way through where the designer won't walk in and catch them. It's happened in the bear making world too, and that's a much, much smaller customer/design base.

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  41. I've had that same problem...a handful of shops have sold my Sprocket Pillow pattern/template in that same way, one time I was on my way out of a local shop and saw it there for sale for $5.00...they were super embarrassed and luckily very nice but it's still disheartening...if it's happening locally it could be happening all over!

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  42. I feel like i've been hearing more and more of this! Artisania's blog just posted last week about a web based shop doing the same thing.. How could people think thats right? You're a prominent blog and pattern writer.. how could they think they would fly under the radar with that! So infuriating, I don't write patterns (because I lack the skill haha) but for you guys who put so much time and effort, especially into FREE ones.. its disgusting.

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  43. And the brick and mortar is making a mere $4 a pattern---NO price is worth it or legal,but for $4 geeesh! That is ridiculous:( Are they hurting that bad?! If they really liked your pattern ,they should have called you or directed themselves to your blog so they could get the pattern there. Doh.

    Hope something good comes of this for you Lee:)

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  44. WOW. Thanks for bringing this to our attention! I think my LQS only sells legit patterns but it's good to be aware. I'm sorry you've experienced this! I hope you gave that shop an earful.

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  45. Wow! If it were me I would get a cease desist letter sent and follow up with a request that they make a healthy donation to the Modern Quilt Guild in your & Modas name. They profited illegally from your work, they should at least give that money to a good cause.

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  46. So, how does Moda feel about this? I'm sure they could make a huge dent in the bottom line of an unscrupulous store that sells free product to make a profit. If Moda cancelled the stores fabric account and removed any remaining Moda stock, I imagine that might send a pretty strong message.

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  47. Hmmm. So I saw a class at my lqs that printed a pattern for a classs and charged a printing fee of 3 dollars for a moda pattern. I don't frequent their store much anymore. It's kinda like their free Bernina classes that ask you to pay $30 for a Bernina class booklet that is free online. Is this a troubling way to get around copyright?

    So sorry, peopl suck. I have been asked many times for a free copy or pdf form for my cathedral window tut. Umm no!!!

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  48. Thank you for warning us designers! I just started out with my own designs on craftsy. I will look more closely at other patterns in online shops and stores. We need to stop this! Designing is so much fun, fulfilling yes, but time consuming too. I would like something back for my effort so I can pay for the fabrics I have used in the design process.... Maybe a new sewing machine in the future :-)
    ipatchandquilt.wordpress.com

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  49. Something that shocked me was that I found people taking apart their magazines and selling the patterns on Ebay.

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  50. Lee - Straight up question here: Is there any standard regarding selling items created with a specific pattern or fabric line? To me it seems that when I purchase a pattern and purchase the fabric, that whatever I make from it is mine to do whatever I wish... and yet I've run across varying perspectives with that thought and copyright. The labor is still mine. The workmanship is still mine. Where are the lines of ownership? Is it only right to sell [completed work] what you design yourself, beginning to end? Fabric and layout? Is it fair use if you compensate the fabric and/or pattern designers for a particular sale?

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    1. Unless the designer transfers rights to you the customer to make items with that pattern and sell them (explicitly stated either when you purchase it or inside the pattern itself), then you would not have the legal right to sell anything made with the pattern. A pattern generally falls into a "limited-license" category in which the designer extends certain rights to their intellectual property to the customer under certain guidelines. A pattern that reads "for personal use only" really means that if some choses to make items using that pattern and sell them without securing additional permission from the designer, they could be found legally liable for copyright infringement.

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    2. May I ask if you know of a link or reference regarding this? Information I have read about copyright law says the opposite: when you copyright a pattern, it is the instructions (including illustrations) that you copyright. When people add "for personal use only" on a pattern, it seems to me the pattern maker is ill informed, and I stay clear. (Not that I've sold any quilts or have plans to do so--it's the principle of someone putting a threatening statement that is a smokescreen on their produce.)

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  51. I so would love you to add this to my Linky Party today, great information.

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  52. why isn't someone suing the offending shop? if the chances of getting caught is low, aren't the chances of getting sued even slimmer? what are the chances of getting a settlement that is significant enough to benefit the harmed parties? i can't imagine the feds raiding a neighborhood quilt store!

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  53. amazing! So crappy, I can't believe that was happening! Glad you found it and thanks for sharing. I'll be on the look out.

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  55. Thanks for sharing this experience in your post. This past year I published my first couple of patterns with plans to expand this year so this is a good thing for me to be aware of. I work very hard designing, sewing, writing, testing my patterns as I'm sure you do and it's very discouraging to think people just don't understand or appreciate all the work involved. Worse still when they think they can do what they want with something just because it's online. I think too many people actually expect everything to be free these days because of the internet. Makes it hard to make a little money for your work. I love your patterns and your style. Keep designing.

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  56. Wow, that's horrible! I can't believe they thought they could get away with it, that's just awful. I hope that other than this mess you're doing well!

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  57. Lee thanks for sharing this. We all need a reminder about COPYRIGHT and plagiarism. The latter is claiming to have created something, when in fact you stole someone else's creation. That is not the same thing as violating copyright. Copyright is the right to copy, and it needs to be actively protected. That means labeling your work with a copyright notice (i.e. (c) SG Hilsenbeck 2013). In all the discussion, I did not see any mention of presence of a copyright notices. There are rules about what constitutes a valid copyright notice, and without such a notice, it is my understanding that you have not retained your copyright. Inclusion of a copyright notice does not prevent you from making your work available. You can assign the right to copy to others, for example, by stating in your notice that the material can be freely copied for personal use, but must not be altered in any way, and must not copied for commercial purposes. I don't sell patterns or make designs for a living, but I do give copies of my designs to others, and the document I create always includes a copyright notice.

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    1. Even if you do not include the copyright notice, you still retain full copyright (and legal protection). Adding the copyright notice is actually more of a visual reminder of who retains the copyright and may help to strengthen a case in court against infringement. This document offers a great overview of copyright in the U.S.: http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf

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  58. i just thought of another question...who holds the copyright on this material? you or moda? what can moda do, since they are the big corporation?

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    1. This is a great question. I did not sign a contract transferring the rights to Moda, as I routinely do with magazine patterns. But at the same time, the infringement is clearly on the Moda Bake Shop blog, since that is the only place this tutorial has legitimately been published. So I think this is a gray area. I'm really not looking for Moda to take any action against the shop or anything of that sort - the shop promised me that they would take it off the shelves, so I'm taking them at their word, and that's that. I just wanted to make sure people were aware that this kind of thing is out there and to be on the lookout for it. Thanks for your comment!

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  59. I am so sorry to hear that. I have taught classes using patterns by designers but I have always given credit where credit is due. Since I usually teach new quilters, I also always share all the free places to get patterns including moda bakeshop. If I am using a moda bake shop pattern I use the print function and make it very clear that that is where the pattern came from. I am so sad to hear that they would do something like that. I hope you said something and I know that I would say something to any one that did something like that.

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  60. Wowza, Lee. Seriously. WOW! I will definitely keep an eye out for my fellow peeps.

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  61. OMG. That's terrible! You must be really peeved.......

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  62. Wow Lee! That really is horrible. I am so sorry this happened to you. I hope that at the very least you can prevent them from continuing to do this and in the best case scenario have Moda advocate for you. I worry about this too and hope that I never stumble across a similar situation.

    Have you ever thought about registering your copyright? It might not be worth it for a free pattern, but maybe for the patterns you sell. From what I understand, if you do register with the government and have a similar situation occur, there are protections put in place to help you make a stronger case in court and possibly have your legal fees covered by the infringing party (if they are found to be at fault). It might be something to consider, especially as you grow as a business.

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    1. Thanks so much, Jenelle! I haven't done a lot of research into the issue of registering my copyright. But my understanding is that it really just gives you a stronger case if/when you sue someone—and I highly doubt I would ever bother suing anyone, at least not at this point. I'm sure the dollar amounts we're talking about here are so small that they'd be thrown out of small claims court, LOL. And up to this point, what I've made on ALL my pattern sales combined probably wouldn't even cover my legal fees if I were to sue someone. In this case, it's really more the principal of the thing that I'm concerned with, rather than the dollar amounts. But copyright registration is something I might revisit in the future if I think my business warrants it.

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  63. a few years ago, when I first started making things again and before I discovered blogland and free patterns, I bought a pattern for a knitted bunny from ebay. A few months late I came across the patter for free on the Lion Brand Website. I emailed them, and the shop that had sold me the pattern. Know what she said? "I never said the same pattern wasn't available for free". I was stunned. I reported her to ebay.

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  64. I am very glad you blogged about this so other people can be on the lookout. As to the shop in question - they did finally take down my "borrowed" graphics that they had "found" on the internet, LOL!!

    And yes, I'm interested in carrying paper copies of your printed patterns so I'll be in touch :-)

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  65. In response to the print out sheets that you find in local quilt shops from Moda. They are legit, and yes, you can download them from Moda for free as well as getting them from your local shops too. The difference in these sheets vs. the bake shop tutorials is that Moda is promoting them. I will guarantee that the sales rep for Moda has these patterns on their list to show off to the shops. I have seen these patterns at my local shops and at the Fat Quarter Shop, which Fat Quarter Shop sells these patterns for a $1.00 or .50 cents. I will go on to say that these printed patterns are not part of the bake shop. These printed patterns are promotional patterns from Moda to give the consumer ideas of what they can do with the new and upcoming fabric lines. If you notice Moda's fabric designers names are on these patterns and not someone like Lee or myself. Do I think its highway robbery that these shops are selling these printable patterns for $6.00 or more? Well, hell yeah I do!
    As for the bake shop patterns, it does not hurt to take the time to get to know the Chefs list and who is on it. It does not hurt to know what designs that have been produced and to keep in mind when you do go into a shop whether it is brick and mortar or a virtual one do make a stink about it and then let the designer know.

    Oh for the record this is posted at the very bottom of the Moda Bake Shop:

    © 2009 Moda Bake Shop
    The individual designers featured on this website ultimately hold the copyright for their projects and designs posted on the Moda Bake Shop. All patterns are to be used for personal, non-commercial use only, unless given explicit written permission from the design owner to sell finished products made from their pattern tutorials featured on the Moda Bake Shop.

    Guess that shop didn't see that!

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  66. The entire situation is terrible, but your comic sans comment made my day :-)

    ReplyDelete
  67. There is never a good reason for Comic Sans. Ever. Oh the shame...

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  68. I am very glad you and a couple others have posted this alot of us appreciate all the hard work,tutorials and encouragement you provide and do not like a bad apple to ruin it for all of us Thank-you for all you do Becky D

    ReplyDelete
  69. Wow, this is very interesting. I live in Wisconsin and have purchased a printed pattern that I later found out was offered for free online. The next time I was in the shop I mentioned that I had found the pattern for free online and a staff person told me the price, $4, was to cover the cost of ink, paper, and their time.

    I was completely ok with that answer but now I see I should have been up in arms.
    R

    ReplyDelete
  70. I am so sorry to hear about this. It is such a great pattern. I have a simply color jelly roll and yardage to make this. Just need to find the time :)

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  71. First off--anyone who would pay $4 for a cheaply printed pattern in a Comic Sans font obviously does not know about the online quilting community. It is a shame that the quilt shop in question thought they could pawn bad workmanship like what they did to your pattern off on unsuspecting customers. With all of the free tutorials like MBS and all of the beautiful quilting magazines, and all of the great patterns for sale on sites like craftsy, threadbias, etc--it's a wonder that anyone would spend $4 on what this shop was trying to pass off.

    Bet they felt dumb when the actual pattern designer called them on the carpet about it...I hope you told them you were most offended at the attempt to ruin your pattern with cheap printing and comic sans font use more than anything...

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  72. I, too, would think twice about buying a pattern that uses Comic Sans. : )

    You were TOTALLY wronged by this clear violation of copyright, but kudos for you for handling it with class.

    ReplyDelete
  73. Wow, that really stinks!! I did a double take when I saw this post. I just last week downloaded your Cross Terrain pattern from Moda Bake Shop (after doing a Google search for quilts using the Terrain line) and am making it as a wedding gift - in fact I am starting the quilt tomorrow! You better believe I will be linking to your site and the Moda Bake shop!!

    ReplyDelete

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Disclosures

In addition to my paid sponsors, I sometimes accept free fabric, notions, or tools in exchange for posting about it on this blog or my other social media platforms. But I pledge that this practice will never change one of my product reviews or lead me to use fabric or other items that are not "my style."

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Copyright and Permissions FAQ

Can I make a quilt that looks just like one of yours? Of course! You don't need my permission for that. But remember, it's polite (and helpful to others) to credit your source of inspiration.

Can I share one of your photos on my blog or website? Probably! But please contact me for permission first. Use of my photos for commercial purposes is prohibited.

Can I pin your photos to Pinterest? Yes, please do! I love Pinterest!

Can I sell individual items made from your tutorials or patterns? Yes! But please don't open a factory and start churning out hundreds of them. : ) And please do not reproduce or sell the patterns or tutorials themselves. Thank you!